cain

Systems related to High Energy Physics


Schoonschip, Version 91


Copyright (C) 1991 by Martinus J. G. Veltman.

The copyrights to the Schoonschip program and source code are owned exclusively by their author, M.J.G. Veltman. The executable code, as well as the example and documentation files listed below, may be freely disseminated and used on a not-for-profit basis--small charges may be made to cover distribution costs. We think it important that the files in this distribution be kept together in any redistribution.

This software is provided "as is," and includes no guarantee of support, implied or otherwise. Neither the author nor his agents shall be responsible for any problems associated with its use. A reasonable effort will be made to correct bugs, which may be reported to

Prof. M.J.G. Veltman
Physics Department
University of Michigan>BR> Ann Arbor, MI 48109

or

Prof. David N. Williams
Physics Department
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109

David_N._Williams@um.cc.umich.edu
DWilliams@UMiPhys.bitnet
75706.3124@CompuServe.com

Overview

Schoonschip is an algebraic manipulation program, which was designed for large problems, originally in particle physics, and which pioneered a number of the concepts now generally used in algebraic computation. Its interface is not as slick as some of the "modern" symbolic manipulation programs, and it does not have as many built-in procedures as some of them do, requiring the user to construct more of his own. But it is written in machine language and is fast, capable, and efficient in its use of machine resources.

It has been developed always in a context of solving real problems, over a period of nearly 28 years. As a result it is (relatively) bug free, and its algorithms embody a certain experience. It has to be emphasized that no program of this complexity can be truly bug free, and that the problem of ensuring the correctness of machine solutions to real problems remains unsolved, and must always be taken seriously by the user.

Availability

Schoonschip is available on a large variety of computers ranging from PC, Amiga, Atari, Macintosh, etc. to Unix platforms. It can be obtained via anonymous ftp from archive.umich.edu in the directory physics/schip.
Special Purpose Systems


webmaster@can.nl

Last updated: December 19, 1994